The Product Roadmap vs. the Project Roadmap

It’s amazing what you learn when you stop talking at work and start listening. This is particularly true when you are meeting with the world’s best innovators and product builders. We get to practice our listening skills a lot, because at Aha! we speak with hundreds of product managers each week.

To our own surprise, we consistently hear someone tell us that they found Aha! while searching for “a great project management tool.”

We love hearing this — but we always clarify that there is a big difference between product and project management. Especially when it comes to roadmaps.

While there are some similarities, there are also many key differences between product roadmaps and project roadmaps. And understanding them starts with knowing the difference between a product and a project.

A product is a good or service which is provided to a group of users. Products can be anything ranging from physical products to software applications to services which are delivered to an end user.

A project is a series of tasks or plans which are implemented over a set period of time. Once its outcome has been accomplished, the project is complete.

Products and projects are interconnected in many ways. The key way that they are related is that a product often contains many projects before it is ready to be launched or updated. Each project has a clear timeline with clear start and end dates. The latter date denotes when the project has been accomplished. Some may even consider “sprints” to be mini-projects.

However, a product does not have a clear start and end date. Instead, the product will continually be improved over time as feedback is collected from end users and the product team prioritizes what to build based on what will create the most value.

The overall purpose
The biggest difference between product roadmaps and project roadmaps is the overall purpose of each roadmap and how these purposes relate to organizational goals.

A product roadmap is used to communicate the product’s strategic path to achieve business goals. Product roadmaps can be used by product teams at diverse organizations. Software companies and toy companies both produce products. So, product teams within both companies can use product roadmaps to plan their work. The core similarity between product roadmaps is that they are typically used for products and services that are sold to customers.

On the other hand, a project roadmap is more tactical in nature and used chiefly to communicate the tasks needed to complete the project. “Project” in this case can refer to anything. Project roadmaps can be used to implement a new recruiting service or deploy an email server. The core similarity between project roadmaps is that they are often used to plan internal efforts.

Components
Another area where these two types of roadmaps often differ is in their components. Product managers have different goals than project managers. So, it is natural that a product roadmap will contain different content than a project roadmap.

Product roadmaps often include the following types of components:

  • Product goals
  • Strategic initiatives
  • Key releases and features which will deliver on the goals
  • Epics
  • Major users stories or features
  • Overall timeline

Project roadmaps often include these types of components:

  • Project goals and objectives
  • Important milestones and tasks
  • Resource allocation
  • Project timeline
  • Potential risks

So, the focus area for each roadmap is clear. The product roadmap provides the plan for achieving the product goals, which are often related to business goals. The project roadmap also lays out a plan but is typically focused on the timeline for a specific project.

Examples
Product roadmaps typically include high-level strategic initiatives, key upcoming releases, and features which will be used to drive towards those short-term and long-term goals. The product roadmap communicates the product’s overall direction to internal and external stakeholders. It is also used to determine priorities and ensure that plans will support the key business goals.
product-roadmap-example
In comparison, a project roadmap is a plan which takes the project objectives and provides a timeline of specific tasks and milestones which must be achieved before the project is accomplished. Project roadmaps typically consist of the project goals; the key milestones and tasks to achieve those goals; and a timeline that determines the overall schedule.

Since a project has a fixed start and end date, it is sometimes visualized like the release above. This allows stakeholders to have a complete picture of the timeline and expectations so that everyone understands the scope of the project.

The creation process
A product manager typically leads the roadmapping process. She works with cross-functional teams including engineering, sales, marketing, and the executive team to build the plan which will meet key business goals and objectives. During this process, it is important for a product manager to begin with a goal-first approach towards her product. As the roadmap is created, it will cover high-level areas that will contribute to the product’s success.

On the other hand, a project manager typically creates the project roadmap. The project manager is less concerned with product goals, as his own goal is to complete his project within its specified timeline. Project roadmaps consider overall resources and team capacity, as well as the milestones which must be reached to deliver the project.

The sharing process
It is essential to share both types of roadmaps with internal and external teams so that stakeholders can stay informed of the product or project’s progress. Keeping stakeholders involved allows teams to operate more effectively.

Sharing product roadmaps helps teams understand the overall strategy of the product, as well as the details around implementing features and communicating key benefits to customers. This allows internal teams to stay focused and informed of how upcoming features will impact the customer.

Sharing project roadmaps helps internal teams understand the timeline for specific milestones of the project. Projects often have budgetary or resource-related constraints. Communicating the project roadmap allows cross-functional teams to understand how these factors relate to their own projects and teams.

Both product and project roadmaps are both essential for business. They keep teams on the same page towards building something lasting.

Great products are the result of having a breakthrough idea and explaining to the team where you are headed. This means that great product teams know how to build and manage product and project roadmaps — and they know when to use each one.

About Ron and Aha!

Ron is a product guy. He is the Director of Product Management at Aha! - the world’s #1 product roadmap software. He previously founded and sold his own company and has been on the founding team of multiple venture-backed companies.

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Comments

  1. Jeff Brantley

    Ron, Excellent post and summary of the differences. I don’t know how many times I’ve had to clarify the same concepts with others. Keep staying true to your product mission at Aha!

    Reply
  2. Angelo Embuldeniya

    Great article! I specifically searched for roadmap and product management software – and read good things about Aha! online. The free trial is nice and is the reason I get to try out full feature sets – the experience has been amazing!

    After running day 7 in trial mode of Aha! I’ve arrived at the conclusion that you have the Slacks of the world, the Asanas of the world and even the Hubspots of the world (all of which my team use internally) – but it’s best to use a decent tool for what it’s cut out for and made to be, than experiment with plug-ins and die of bloat. Congrats Aha! team!

    Reply
  3. Felix

    Great article but how would you position your software in all that? I fully agree with all you’re saying and love Aha! to build my product roadmap. However the overall value gets harmed by the lack of options to connect project roadmaps to it. There should be a layer between product and engineering and I’d love to understand how Aha! could help to achieve it.

    Reply

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